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  • Let's hear it from @bankuei on RPGs excluding marginalized folks

    jhameia:

    A short storify of an epic rant.


    86 notes || Posted on the lovely 17th of August in 2014 @ 15.36
  • blue-author:

    putmeincoach:

    An all-female Ghostbusters cast and a Michael Bay directed Ninja Turtles movie in which (Spoiler, but who cares?) April kills Shredder. I hope feminists are happy that white knights are pandering to their delicate egos at the expense of beloved franchises. 

    My childhood is essentially dead at this point. 

    If TMNT can survive both Shredder and April being turned white, I think it can survive a change in the fundamental dramatic relationships among the characters.


    2,095 notes || Posted on the lovely 15th of August in 2014 @ 00.02
  • Im pretty sad that harley and ivy arent canon lesbians for eachother i mean cOME ON

    Anonymous

    elphabaforpresidentofgallifrey:

    nannairb:

    jasonttodd:

    they

    image

    are

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    so

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    canon

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    i

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    dont

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    care

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    what

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    anyone

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    says

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    even babs knows

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    image

    image

    YOU FORGOT HARLEY’S REACTION TO THAT, ASKING IF SHE MEANS LIKE HOW PEOPLE SAY BATGIRL AND SUPERGIRL ARE FRIENDS

    THEN BATGIRL CHANGES THE SUBJECT

    SUPER LESBIANS DESERVE THEIR OWN SUPER SHOW


    43,442 notes || Posted on the lovely 14th of August in 2014 @ 12.01
  • anqemon:

Princess Unikitty in the style of Lisa Frank :)

    anqemon:

    Princess Unikitty in the style of Lisa Frank :)


    2,786 notes || Posted on the lovely 11th of August in 2014 @ 20.09
  • funnierthanjesus:

I found the rebel bass

    funnierthanjesus:

    I found the rebel bass

    (via ladyporthos)


    28,032 notes || Posted on the lovely 10th of August in 2014 @ 22.28
  • Janet Van Dyne MCU Costume Reveal

    ohwhatagooseiam:

    image

    (via seananmcguire)


    3,150 notes || Posted on the lovely 10th of August in 2014 @ 00.42

  • 17,907 notes || Posted on the lovely 4th of August in 2014 @ 07.16
  • ca-tsuka:

    Happy Geek Pride Day with Ukiyo-e Heroes by Jed Henry.


    2,512 notes || Posted on the lovely 4th of August in 2014 @ 06.06
  • playing the line-dot-thing game with Hoenn Map

    trumpetsconfirmed:

    mana-pudding:

    image

    holy shit

    (via blackmageeljin)


    7,524 notes || Posted on the lovely 2nd of August in 2014 @ 03.13
  • theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

    theatlantic:

    The Quiet Radicalism of All That

    The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

    But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

    Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

    In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

    Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

    (via moniquill)


    10,748 notes || Posted on the lovely 20th of July in 2014 @ 12.01
  • ONWARD!!!! »